Friday, March 27, 2009

Spring Sale and New Military Art

Spring is just around the corner and we are pleased to announce our Spring Fever Sale. For a limited time, Save 15% on our giclee prints at: http://www.markkarvon.com/.

We have new additions to our World War II as well as Modern Aviation subjects.


We are also pleased to expand our new military collection of prints with two new print offerings, “Merkava Mk III BAZ” and "Challenger II". We will be adding new additions to our military line throughout 2009!


In addition to our Spring Sale we are also excited about our new "Warbird" and "Iron Horse" collections of apparel and merchandise at Karvon Graphics. Stop by and see what we have to offer.


Mark Karvon
Fine Art by Mark Karvon
E-mail: cbscharlotte@ctc.net
Website: http://www.markkarvon.com/
T-shirts: Karvon Graphics

























Sunday, March 1, 2009

The Only Thing We have To Fear Is Fear Itself

Taken from a Wall Street Journal article by Bradley R. Schiller. The article in it's entirety may be read here: [link]

"....our current economic woes don't come close to those of the 1930s. At worst, a comparison to the 1981-82 recession might be appropriate. Consider the job losses that Mr. Obama always cites. In the last year, the U.S. economy shed 3.4 million jobs. That's a grim statistic for sure, but represents just 2.2% of the labor force. From November 1981 to October 1982, 2.4 million jobs were lost -- fewer in number than today, but the labor force was smaller. So 1981-82 job losses totaled 2.2% of the labor force, the same as now.

Job losses in the Great Depression were of an entirely different magnitude. In 1930, the economy shed 4.8% of the labor force. In 1931, 6.5%. And then in 1932, another 7.1%. Jobs were being lost at double or triple the rate of 2008-09 or 1981-82.

This was reflected in unemployment rates. The latest survey pegs U.S. unemployment at 7.6%. That's more than three percentage points below the 1982 peak (10.8%) and not even a third of the peak in 1932 (25.2%). You simply can't equate 7.6% unemployment with the Great Depression.Other economic statistics also dispel any analogy between today's economic woes and the Great Depression.

Real gross domestic product (GDP) rose in 2008, despite a bad fourth quarter. The Congressional Budget Office projects a GDP decline of 2% in 2009. That's comparable to 1982, when GDP contracted by 1.9%. It is nothing like 1930, when GDP fell by 9%, or 1931, when GDP contracted by another 8%, or 1932, when it fell yet another 13%.

Auto production last year declined by roughly 25%. That looks good compared to 1932, when production shriveled by 90%. The failure of a couple of dozen banks in 2008 just doesn't compare to over 10,000 bank failures in 1933, or even the 3,000-plus bank (Savings & Loan) failures in 1987-88. Stockholders can take some solace from the fact that the recent stock market debacle doesn't come close to the 90% devaluation of the early 1930s."


So I wish our "great" leaders would stop trying to push their bloated agenda and pet projects by trying to scare the hell out of everyone by drumming up the Great Depression. Get down to actually doing something that can get this economy humming again.